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Mucous membranes can trigger migraines in rats

Posted October 05, 2018 12:04:57 Mucus membranes may play a role in migrainic attacks in humans.

Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco have found that some rodents in their laboratory are able to secrete mucus that triggers migrainics.

The researchers believe that this mucus may play an important role in triggering migrainical attacks in people.

Dr Niazi Wang, who led the study, said mucus could trigger migrines because it triggers the immune system to attack the nerve endings that line the mouth, ears and throat.

“The mucus acts as a trigger, causing the immune response to go to the target nerve endings,” Dr Wang said.

“It then triggers the onset of the attacks.”

The mucous membrane that triggers the attacks was found to have a similar structure to those found in humans, making it more likely to cause migrainies.

Dr Wang said the mucus can cause symptoms similar to migrainias.

“Mucus is basically a protective membrane.

It keeps the body from getting too warm and helps keep blood vessels clear.”

So if there’s a lot of mucus in the air or it gets in the nose, or if there is a lot in the body, you’re more likely than not to get migrainitis,” she said.

Dr Chen Yang, a professor of neurology at the University, said it was possible the mucous membranes could play a protective role against migraine.”

There are studies that show that mucus protects the brain against brain injuries,” he said.

Mucous may cause migursA recent study by the University found that rats that had their mucus removed from their mouths developed more severe migrainia symptoms than rats that were allowed to keep the mucin.

The mucin had a “similar structure” to those in humans but it also had a similar chemical composition, causing it to be more likely for migraine sufferers to develop migrainous attacks, the researchers said.

The study was published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Professor Wang said while it was unclear how mucus was acting on the immune cells, the research suggested mucus might play a key role in causing migrainas.”

We know that certain mucus molecules can be associated with migraine,” Dr Wagner said.

But she cautioned against drawing any conclusions until further studies could be conducted.

Topics:mental-health,neurology,sciences,psychiatry-and-behavioural-health More stories from New South Wales

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