‘Synthetic membrane: an experimental approach to improve cell function in the elderly’

‘Synthetic membrane: an experimental approach to improve cell function in the elderly’

The synthetic membrane protein Synthetic Membrane is an experimental device that has a remarkable track record in regenerative medicine and is being used to treat people with Parkinson’s disease.

Key points:The synthetic membrane is a non-living membrane that contains a synthetic polymer that contains an active site for a protein.

The polymer interacts with cells to allow it to form a functional membrane.

The synthetic membranes are produced by injecting a polymer into the membrane of a living cell and then exposing the cells to a chemical.

The cells will then start to secrete an inactive protein that is able to bind to the active site of the polymer and allow the cell to repair itself.

The material, a type of protein called a membrane, was invented by Dr Jody Schluter and colleagues at the University of Queensland.

The researchers have previously demonstrated that synthetic membranes can be grown in culture and treated in the laboratory.

But this is the first time that they have shown that the synthetic membrane can be made from a living tissue.

“Our work on the synthetic polymer is very exciting because it allows us to develop a synthetic membrane that can be used in the clinic for patients with Parkinson disease and also for other degenerative diseases,” Dr Schluster said.

“For example, it is possible to treat patients with a form of dementia known as Lewy body disease by using synthetic membranes.”

She said the material could also be used to grow a new generation of synthetic membranes, which could potentially be used as a replacement for diseased tissue.

Dr Schlutton said the team had previously created synthetic membranes in vitro and had successfully grown the material in the lab.

“But the membrane we’ve grown so far is made from the cells of a human cell, so it’s not really clear how the cells would respond to it, but it’s certainly promising,” she said.

Topics:stem-cell,biotechnology,medical-research,biomedicine,biomaterials-and-substances,arts-and-“ends,”health,diseases-and/or-disorders,science-and%E2%80%99-sports,physics,uq,brisbane-4000,brisbanetimes-4068,brisbournville-4055,port-macquarie-4217,lincoln-3141,qld,nsw,brisford-4215,portsea-4300,nsh,southport-4210,portland-4830,darling-st-louis-4400,quetta-4880,tas,qatar,portlands-4810,logan-3280Contact Chris KennedyMore stories from Queensland

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